The World Of Snakes

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Picture Credit: Wikimedia

Colubridae

The largest family of snakes in the world with 249 genera, they are found on all continents except in Antarctica. These snakes are rear-fanged with some of them being dangerous to humans otherwise in general don’t pose a threat to humans. The most commonly found Colubridae in India is the Oriental Rat Snake (ptyas mucosa) or commonly known as dhaman in parts of India. They are non-venomous snakes that measure about 1.5 to 1.9 m long (4ft 11 inches to 6ft 5 inches) though some may exceed 2 metres. They are semi-arboreal, diurnal and agile snakes, colour patterns vary depending on the type of area they reside in, pale brown in dry regions and almost black in wet regions.

Picture Credit: Pinterest
Picture Credit: Pinterest

Elapidae

This family has one of the most venomous and fastest snakes in the world. These include cobras, kraits and other deadly snakes. They are slender snakes with front proteroglyphus fangs that they use to inject venom into their prey. They are found in Africa, South and South-East Asia, America and the Pacific. These snakes possess highly neurotoxic venom that affects the victims nervous system. The most venomous snake of this family is the Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) one of the most deadliest snake in the African continent.

Picture Credit: Pinterest
Picture Credit: Pinterest
Picture Credit: Wikimedia
Picture Credit: sustain round glass
Picture Credit: Pinterest
Picture Credit: National Geographic Kids
Picture Credit: Wikipedia
  1. Neurotoxic Venom
    This type of venom is primarily found in elapids( Cobras, Kraits and Taipans). As the name suggests this venom contains potent neurotoxins which attacks the central nervous system. Symptoms found in a victim from a Spectacled Cobra bite are muscle paralysis in the skeletal muscles, ptosis, frothy saliva and respiratory failure.
  2. Hemotoxic Venom
    This type of venom is found in the family Viperidae. This type of venom causes disruption of blood clotting, destruction of red blood cells, organ tissue damage . Symptoms found in a victim bitten by a Russell’s pit viper are bleeding in gums and urine, kidney failure and fall in blood pressure and heart rate.
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  1. Try to relax the person and make them lie down if the bite was below chest level, make sure they don’t move at all so that there’s less spread of venom throughout the body.
  2. Cover the wound with a loose and sterile bandage on the wound.
  3. Call emergency services immediately.

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Abhidyu Ajila

A zoology student who talks animals, conservation, evolution and geography